Deep Decarbonization

Deep Decarbonization2018-03-08T23:57:34+00:00

Deep decarbonization…what is that?

Deep decarbonization means massively and quickly reducing our carbon footprint.

  • Despite rapid growth of wind and solar, global carbon dioxide emissions are not going down.

  • Traditional hydroelectric power generation is nearly at capacity.

  • Nuclear power is urgently needed to displace leaky methane as a backup for intermittent renewables.

Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 1980 – 2016

To avoid catastrophic climate change we urgently need to switch to carbon-free electricity.

  • Nuclear power accounts for 60% of carbon free electricity in the U.S.

  • Nuclear power is the only carbon free source of electricity that is available 24/7.

  • Wind and solar require fossil fuel backups.

To avoid catastrophic climate change we urgently need to switch to carbon-free electricity.

  • Nuclear power accounts for 60% of carbon free electricity in the U.S.

  • Nuclear power is the only carbon free source of electricity that is available 24/7.

  • Wind and solar require fossil fuel backups.

Uranium can release at least 1 million times more energy than the same mass of oil or coal, resulting in:

  • Less fuel needed

  • Ease of on-site storage

  • Smaller land footprint

  • Less waste

Links We Like

“To stay below 2 degrees Celsius of warming, global emissions would likely have to peak in the next few years and then be cut by half every decade all the way down to zero by midcentury.”

“If we are to deeply decarbonize our grid in the long term, it would be prudent for our nation to keep a diversity of options, including nuclear.”

“…the International Panel on Climate Change found that, without nuclear, we are less likely to keep the planet from disastrous levels of warming, and the effort will be more expensive.”